Tag Archives: world vision

30-Hour Famine 2012 in Malaysia 马来西亚饥饿30

30-Hour Famine (google image)

30-Hour Famine (google image)

About hunger crisis

Now the world’s population has reached 7 billion, the demand for food is even more pressing. The question we need to ask now is: will there be enough food to feed 7 billion people?

Technically, there is, but still…

Hard Facts:

Why do 925 million people go to bed hungry every night?

Our agricultural system is inefficient

The effects of severe climate changes

Escalating global food prices.

Do you know that, each year, 5 million children under the age of 5 die of malnutrition?

About 30-Hour Famine

The 30-Hour Famine is a global movement against hunger and poverty. Over the years, the 30-Hour Famine has gained a reputation as one of the biggest and most fun fundraising event in the world particularly among youths and young adults.

By going without solid food for 30 hours, you can bring change to the lives of those impacted by hunger and poverty. You can give them access to improved health care, a better quality of life and most importantly, HOPE for a brighter tomorrow.

Participants will have an opportunity to get a first-hand simulated experience of living life in dire conditions through various Famine Challenges and educational movies. At the end of the fasting period, participants will break-fast together at their respective DIY Camp venues or to participate in the the 30-Hour Famine centralised Countdown event.

In Malaysia, how did it start?

The first 30-Hour Famine in Malaysia started back in 1997 and it was a joint effort between World Vision Malaysia and Sin Chew Daily in response to the famine in North Korea. Funds poured in and a record of RM2.6 million was raised.

What happened next?

The 30-Hour Famine slowly gained its popularity. Major corporates joined the movement by offering their support in terms of sponsorship. In the year 2002, HELP University College came on board and played host for both the English and Chinese camps. Thanks to the strong media support, the 30-Hour Famine movement in Malaysia continues to attract more of the public to participate in this movement.

30-Hour Famine Do-It-Yourself Camps

In the year 2008, 30-Hour Famine was introduced in a new format, the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) format. This enabled people from other states in Malaysia to take part in the Famine movement. 50 DIY camps were held across Peninsular Malaysia in, after which campers attended a star-studded countdown event.

Still up and moving!

The 30-Hour Famine movement continues to gain support from both old and new participants. New elements such as the 8-Hour Kidz Famine for children aged 12 and below was introduced to educate the younger generation on social concerns and Famine Youth Leaders who were given an opportunity to learn more about World Vision’s work and to share with their peers and the public.

What can you do

1. Join The Famine!
Go hungry so others don’t have to. Together, we can overcome hunger.

2. Spread The Word
Speak out and advocate for change! Share the Famine page with your friends through Facebook, Twitter, Myspace or blog!

3. Champion The Cause
There is enough food in the world but food is not equally distributed. Why not get your school club or company to provide for the hungry by joining the 30-Hour Famine or giving to the Famine Fund?

4. Sponsor a child!
Give a child a shot at life by transforming his community. This is a long-term commitment to ensure he and his community will be fed and be self-subsistent in the long run!

5. Eat right and Stay Healthy
You owe it to yourself to eat right to stay as fit as a fiddle every day. Given the access to nutritious natural foods in Malaysia, there are no excuses to practice unhealthy diets or skip your meals unnecessarily!

6. Make the Change
Change your own lifestyle and live prudently. Let’s not be wasteful with food and learn to be grateful for what we have.

[source : http://www.worldvision.com.my/famine/]

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juesatta awakening foundation: japan quake relief mission launched

juesatta awakening foundation logo (draft)

juesatta awakening foundation logo (draft)

A huge 8.9 earthquake, subsequent tsunami, and nuclear meltdown struck Japan on March 11th at 2:46 pm, causing immeasurable human suffering and physical damage. Officials say at least 10,000 people were killed, many more are still missing or injured, and millions are without food, water, power in Japan.

Major disasters always require a huge amount of international support to provide relief and long term recovery efforts. Japan, being one of the world’s most generous nations, has always donated when other countries have experienced disasters. In these, their days of greatest need now, we stand ready and are eager to help the Japanese in this time of great trial.

I’ve received calls these two days from friends who  have expressed their sympathy and wish of helping those who are at risk in Japan now. We are getting the assessments by the reputable aid organisations such as Red Cross, Tzu Chi, World Vision, Salvation Army and those already have a presence in the impacted area and their response will likely be faster and more efficinet than other organizations that are not on the ground.

Right now, while waiting and see how the relief situation develops, we express our heartfelt sympathy for the tragic loss and are ready to assist the reputable aid organisations. Friends, you can make a donation to well-known charitable organisations or through us as we are collecting fund and will make the transfer next week to the organisations mentioned that are working on relief and recovery in the region.

A woman cries amid the destruction in Natori, Japan (Reuters photo)

A woman cries amid the destruction in Natori, Japan (Reuters photo)

Residents walk along a path overlooking shattered homes from the tsunami in Kesen Numa, Miyagi Prefecture. (Reuters photo)

Residents walk along a path overlooking shattered homes from the tsunami in Kesen Numa, Miyagi Prefecture. (Reuters photo)

A man surveys the damage in Minami Sanriku, a town in Miyago Prefecture, on Tuesday, March 15. (AFP/Getty photo)

A man surveys the damage in Minami Sanriku, a town in Miyago Prefecture, on Tuesday, March 15. (AFP/Getty photo)

A Self Defense Forces soldier holds a 4-month-old baby in Ishinomaki city in Miyagi prefecture Monday. The child survived the tsunami with her family. (AFP/Getty photo)

A Self Defense Forces soldier holds a 4-month-old baby in Ishinomaki city in Miyagi prefecture Monday. The child survived the tsunami with her family. (AFP/Getty photo)

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